Cerebrospinal fluid pulse pressure amplitude during lumbar infusion in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus can predict response to shunting.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10143/96375
Title:
Cerebrospinal fluid pulse pressure amplitude during lumbar infusion in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus can predict response to shunting.
Authors:
Eide, Per K; Brean, Are
Citation:
Cerebrospinal fluid research. 2010, 7:5
Additional Links:
http://www.cerebrospinalfluidresearch.com

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorEide, Per Ken
dc.contributor.authorBrean, Areen
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-13T09:16:17Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-13T09:16:17Z-
dc.date.issued2010-02-12-
dc.identifier.citationCerebrospinal fluid research. 2010, 7:5en
dc.identifier.issn1743-8454-
dc.identifier.pmid20205911-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1743-8454-7-5-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10143/96375-
dc.description.abstractABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: We have previously seen that idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) patients having elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) pulse amplitude consistently respond to shunt surgery. In this study we explored how the cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP) pulse amplitude determined during lumbar infusion testing, correlates with ICP pulse amplitude determined during over-night ICP monitoring and with response to shunt surgery. Our goal was to establish a more reliable screening procedure for selecting iNPH patients for shunt surgery using lumbar intrathecal infusion. METHODS: The study population consisted of all iNPH patients undergoing both diagnostic lumbar infusion testing and continuous over-night ICP monitoring during the period 2002-2007. The severity of iNPH was assessed using our NPH grading scale before surgery and 12 months after shunting. The CSFP pulse was characterized from the amplitude of single pressure waves. RESULTS: Totally 62 iNPH patients were included, 45 of them underwent shunt surgery, in whom 78% were shunt responders. Among the 45 shunted patients, resistance to CSF outflow (Rout) was elevated (>/= 12 mmHg/ml/min) in 44. The ICP pulse amplitude recorded over-night was elevated (i.e. mean ICP wave amplitude >/= 4 mmHg) in 68% of patients; 92% of these were shunt responders. In those with elevated overnight ICP pulse amplitude, we found also elevated CSFP pulse amplitude recorded during lumbar infusion testing, both during the opening phase following lumbar puncture and during a standardized period of lumbar infusion (15 ml Ringer over 10 min). The clinical response to shunting after 1 year strongly associated with the over-night ICP pulse amplitude, and also with the pulsatile CSFP during the period of lumbar infusion. Elevated CSFP pulse amplitude during lumbar infusion thus predicted shunt response with sensitivity of 88 and specificity of 60 (positive and negative predictive values of 89 and 60, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: In iNPH patients, shunt response can be anticipated in 9/10 patients with elevated overnight ICP pulse amplitude, while in only 1/10 with low ICP pulse amplitude. Additionally, the CSFP pulse amplitude during lumbar infusion testing was elevated in patients with elevated over-night ICP pulse amplitude. In particular, measurement of CSFP pulse amplitude during a standardized infusion of 15 ml Ringer over 10 min was useful in predicting response to shunt surgery and can be used as a screening procedure for selection of iNPH patients for shunting.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.cerebrospinalfluidresearch.comen
dc.subjectVDP::Medisinske Fag: 700::Klinisk medisinske fag: 750::Nefrologi, urologi: 772en
dc.titleCerebrospinal fluid pulse pressure amplitude during lumbar infusion in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus can predict response to shunting.en
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.typepeer revieweden
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Neurosurgery, Rikshospitalet University Hospital, N-0027 Oslo, Norway. per.kristian.eide@rikshospitalet.no.en
dc.identifier.journalCerebrospinal fluid researchen
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