SUPPORT Tools for Evidence-informed policymaking in health 18: Planning monitoring and evaluation of policies.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10143/96355
Title:
SUPPORT Tools for Evidence-informed policymaking in health 18: Planning monitoring and evaluation of policies.
Authors:
Fretheim, Atle; Oxman, Andrew David; Lavis, John N; Lewin, Simon
Citation:
Health research policy and systems 2009, 7 Suppl 1:S18
Additional Links:
http://www.health-policy-systems.com/content/7/S1/S18/?mkt=

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFretheim, Atleen
dc.contributor.authorOxman, Andrew Daviden
dc.contributor.authorLavis, John Nen
dc.contributor.authorLewin, Simonen
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-13T09:09:25Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-13T09:09:25Z-
dc.date.issued2009-12-16-
dc.identifier.citationHealth research policy and systems 2009, 7 Suppl 1:S18en
dc.identifier.issn1478-4505-
dc.identifier.pmid20018108-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1478-4505-7-S1-S18-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10143/96355-
dc.description.abstractABSTRACT : This article is part of a series written for people responsible for making decisions about health policies and programmes and for those who support these decision makers.The term monitoring is commonly used to describe the process of systematically collecting data to inform policymakers, managers and other stakeholders whether a new policy or programme is being implemented in accordance with their expectations. Indicators are used for monitoring purposes to judge, for example, if objectives are being achieved, or if allocated funds are being spent appropriately. Sometimes the term evaluation is used interchangeably with the term monitoring, but the former usually suggests a stronger focus on the achievement of results. When the term impact evaluation is used, this usually implies that there is a specific attempt to try to determine whether the observed changes in outcomes can be attributed to a particular policy or programme. In this article, we suggest four questions that can be used to guide the monitoring and evaluation of policy or programme options. These are: 1. Is monitoring necessary? 2. What should be measured? 3. Should an impact evaluation be conducted? 4. How should the impact evaluation be done?en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.health-policy-systems.com/content/7/S1/S18/?mkt=en
dc.subjectVDP::Medisinske Fag: 700::Helsefag: 800::Helsetjeneste- og helseadministrasjonsforskning: 806en
dc.subject.meshHealth Policyen
dc.subject.meshHealth Planning Guidelinesen
dc.subject.meshEvidence Based Medicineen
dc.subject.meshDecision Makingen
dc.titleSUPPORT Tools for Evidence-informed policymaking in health 18: Planning monitoring and evaluation of policies.en
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.typepeer revieweden
dc.contributor.departmentNorwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services, P,O, Box 7004, St, Olavs plass, N-0130 Oslo, Norway; Section for International Health, Institute of General Practice and Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway. atle.fretheim@nokc.no.en
dc.identifier.journalHealth research policy and systemsen
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