Mechanical ventilation in the ICU- is there a gap between the time available and time used for nurse-led weaning?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10143/77154
Title:
Mechanical ventilation in the ICU- is there a gap between the time available and time used for nurse-led weaning?
Authors:
Hansen, Britt Sætre; Fjælberg, Wenche Torunn; Nilsen, Odd Bjarte; Lossius, Hans Morten; Søreide, Eldar
Citation:
Scandinavian journal of trauma, resuscitation and emergency medicine 2008, 16 (1):17
Additional Links:
http://www.sjtrem.com/content/16/1/17

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHansen, Britt Sætre-
dc.contributor.authorFjælberg, Wenche Torunn-
dc.contributor.authorNilsen, Odd Bjarte-
dc.contributor.authorLossius, Hans Morten-
dc.contributor.authorSøreide, Eldar-
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-13T08:44:43Z-
dc.date.available2009-08-13T08:44:43Z-
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.identifier.citationScandinavian journal of trauma, resuscitation and emergency medicine 2008, 16 (1):17en
dc.identifier.issn1757-7241-
dc.identifier.pmid19055712-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1757-7241-16-17-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10143/77154-
dc.description.abstractABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Mechanical ventilation (MV) is a key component in the care of critically ill and injured patients. Weaning from MV constitutes a major challenge in intensive care units (ICUs). Any delay in weaning may increase the number of complications and leads to greater expense. Nurse-led, protocol-directed weaning has become popular, but it remains underused. The aim of this study was to identify and quantify discrepancies between the time available for weaning and time actually used for weaning. Further, we also wished to analyse patient and systemic factors associated with weaning activity. METHODS: This retrospective study was performed in a 12-bed general ICU at a university hospital. Weaning data were collected from 68 adult patients on MV and recorded in terms of ventilator-shifts. One ventilator-shift was defined as an 8-hour nursing shift for one MV patient. RESULTS: Of the 2000 ventilator-shifts analysed, 572 ventilator-shifts were available for weaning. We found that only 46% of the ventilator shifts available for weaning were actually used for weaning. While physician prescription of weaning was associated with increased weaning activity (p < 0.001), a large amount (22%) of weaning took place without physician prescription. Both increased nursing workload and night shifts were associated with reduced weaning activity. During the study period there was a significant increase in performed weaning, both when prescribed or not (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Our study identified a significant gap between the time available and time actually used for weaning. While various patient and systemic factors were linked to weaning activity, the most important factor in our study was whether the intensive care nurses made use of the time available for weaning.en
dc.languageENG-
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sjtrem.com/content/16/1/17en
dc.subjectVDP::Medisinske Fag: 700::Klinisk medisinske fag: 750::Traumatologi: 783en
dc.subject.meshPulmonary Ventilationen
dc.subject.meshRespiratory Airflowen
dc.subject.meshIntensive Care Unitsen
dc.subject.meshNursing Staff, Hospitalen
dc.titleMechanical ventilation in the ICU- is there a gap between the time available and time used for nurse-led weaning?-
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.typepeer revieweden
dc.contributor.departmentDepartments of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavaner, Norway. habs@sus.no.en
dc.identifier.journalScandinavian journal of trauma, resuscitation and emergency medicineen
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