Falciparum malaria and HIV-1 in hospitalized adults in Maputo, Mozambique: does HIV-infection obscure the malaria diagnosis?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10143/76773
Title:
Falciparum malaria and HIV-1 in hospitalized adults in Maputo, Mozambique: does HIV-infection obscure the malaria diagnosis?
Authors:
Berg, Aase; Patel, Sam; Langeland, Nina; Blomberg, Bjorn
Citation:
Malaria journal 2008, 7:252

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBerg, Aase-
dc.contributor.authorPatel, Sam-
dc.contributor.authorLangeland, Nina-
dc.contributor.authorBlomberg, Bjorn-
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-10T08:25:09Z-
dc.date.available2009-08-10T08:25:09Z-
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.identifier.citationMalaria journal 2008, 7:252en
dc.identifier.issn1475-2875-
dc.identifier.pmid19077302-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1475-2875-7-252-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10143/76773-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: The potential impact of HIV-1 on falciparum malaria has been difficult to determine because of diagnostic problems and insufficient epidemiological data. METHODS: In a prospective, cross-sectional study, clinical and laboratory data was registered consecutively for all adults admitted to a medical ward in the Central Hospital of Maputo, Mozambique, during two months from 28th October 2006. Risk factors for fatal outcome were analysed. The impact of HIV on the accuracy of malaria diagnosis was assessed, comparing "Presumptive malaria", a diagnosis assigned by the ward clinicians based on fever and symptoms suggestive of malaria in the absence of signs of other infections, and "Verified malaria", a malaria diagnosis that was not rejected during retrospective review of all available data. RESULTS: Among 333 included patients, fifteen percent (51/333) had "presumptive malaria", ten percent (28 of 285 tested persons) had positive malaria blood slides, while 69.1% (188/272) were HIV positive. Seven percent (n = 23) had "verified malaria", after the diagnosis was rejected in patients with neck stiffness or symptom duration longer than 2 weeks (n = 5) and persons with negative (n = 19) or unknown malaria blood slide (n = 4). Clinical stage of HIV infection (CDC), hypotension and hypoglycaemia was associated with fatal outcome. The "presumptive malaria" diagnosis was rejected more frequently in HIV positive (20/31) than in HIV negative patients (2/10, p = 0.023). CONCLUSION: The study suggests that the fraction of febrile illness attributable to malaria is lower in HIV positive adults. HIV testing should be considered early in evaluation of patients with suspected malaria.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectVDP::Medisinske Fag: 700::Klinisk medisinske fag: 750::Tropemedisin: 761en
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHIV Infectionsen
dc.subject.meshHIV-1en
dc.subject.meshHospitalsen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshHypoglycemiaen
dc.subject.meshHypotensionen
dc.subject.meshMalaria, Falciparumen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshMozambiqueen
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen
dc.titleFalciparum malaria and HIV-1 in hospitalized adults in Maputo, Mozambique: does HIV-infection obscure the malaria diagnosis?en
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.typepeer revieweden
dc.contributor.departmentStavanger University Hospital, Department of Medicine, Stavanger, Norway. aaseberg@lyse.neten
dc.identifier.journalMalaria journalen
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