Pediatric trauma deaths are predominated by severe head injuries during spring and summer.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10143/76448
Title:
Pediatric trauma deaths are predominated by severe head injuries during spring and summer.
Authors:
Søreide, Kjetil; Krüger, Andreas J; Ellingsen, Christian L; Tjosevik, Kjell E
Citation:
Scandinavian journal of trauma, resuscitation and emergency medicine 2009, 17 (1) : 3
Additional Links:
http://www.sjtrem.com/content/17/1/3

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSøreide, Kjetil-
dc.contributor.authorKrüger, Andreas J-
dc.contributor.authorEllingsen, Christian L-
dc.contributor.authorTjosevik, Kjell E-
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-06T11:31:35Z-
dc.date.available2009-08-06T11:31:35Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.citationScandinavian journal of trauma, resuscitation and emergency medicine 2009, 17 (1) : 3en
dc.identifier.issn1757-7241-
dc.identifier.pmid19161621-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1757-7241-17-3-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10143/76448-
dc.description.abstractABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Trauma is the most prevalent cause of death in the young. Insight into cause and time of fatal pediatric and adolescent trauma is important for planning trauma care and preventive measures. Our aim was to analyze cause, severity, mode and seasonal aspects of fatal pediatric trauma. METHODS: Review of all consecutive autopsies for pediatric fatal trauma during a 10-year period within a defined population. RESULTS: Of all pediatric trauma deaths (n = 36), 70% were males, with the gender increasing with age. Median age was 13 years (range 2-17). Blunt trauma predominated (by road traffic accidents) with most (n = 15; 42%) being "soft" victims, such as pedestrians/bicyclist and, 13 (36%) drivers or passengers in motor vehicles.Penetrating trauma caused only 3 deaths. Prehospital deaths (58%) predominated. 15 children (all intubated) reached hospital alive and had severely deranged vital parameters: 8 were hypotensive (SBP < 90 mmHg), 13 were in respiratory distress, and 14 had GCS < 8 on arrival. Emergency procedures were initiated (i.e. neurosurgical decompression, abdominal surgery or pelvic fixation for hemorrhage) in 12 patients. Probability of survival (Ps) was < 33% in over 75% of the fatalities. A bimodal death pattern was evident; the initial peak by CNS injuries and exsanguinations, the latter peak by CNS alone. Most fatalities occurred during spring (53%) or summertime (25%). CONCLUSION: Fatal pediatric trauma occurs most frequently in boys during spring/summer, associated with severe head injuries and low probability of survival. Preventive measures appear mandated in order to reduce this mortality in this age group.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sjtrem.com/content/17/1/3en
dc.subjectVDP::Medisinske Fag: 700::Klinisk medisinske fag: 750::Pediatri: 760en
dc.subjectVDP::Medisinske Fag: 700::Klinisk medisinske fag: 750::Traumatologi: 783en
dc.subject.meshPediatricsen
dc.subject.meshHead Traumaen
dc.subject.meshTraumaen
dc.titlePediatric trauma deaths are predominated by severe head injuries during spring and summer.en
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.typepeer revieweden
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Surgery, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway. ksoreide@mac.com.en
dc.identifier.journalScandinavian journal of trauma, resuscitation and emergency medicineen
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