Concealment of drugs in food and beverages in nursing homes: cross sectional study.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10143/64958
Title:
Concealment of drugs in food and beverages in nursing homes: cross sectional study.
Authors:
Kirkevold, Øyvind; Engedal, Knut
Citation:
BMJ 2005, 330 (7481):20
Additional Links:
http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/330/7481/20?view=long&pmid=15561732

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKirkevold, Øyvind-
dc.contributor.authorEngedal, Knut-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-15T10:22:06Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-15T10:22:06Z-
dc.date.issued2005-01-01-
dc.identifier.citationBMJ 2005, 330 (7481):20en
dc.identifier.issn1468-5833-
dc.identifier.pmid15561732-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmj.38268.579097.55-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10143/64958-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To examine the practice of concealing drugs in patients' foodstuff in nursing homes. DESIGN: Cross sectional study with data collected by structured interview. SETTING: All five health regions in Norway. PARTICIPANTS: Professional carers of 1362 patients in 160 regular nursing home units and 564 patients in 90 special care units for people with dementia. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Frequency of concealment of drugs; who decided to conceal the drugs; how this practice was documented in the patients' records; and what types of drugs were given this way. RESULTS: 11% of the patients in regular nursing home units and 17% of the patients in special care units for people with dementia received drugs mixed in their food or beverages at least once during seven days. In 95% of cases, drugs were routinely mixed in the food or beverages. The practice was documented in patients' records in 40% (96/241) of cases. The covert administration of drugs was more often documented when the physician took the decision to hide the drugs in the patient's foodstuff (57%; 27/47) than when the person who made the decision was unknown or not recorded (23%; 7/30). Patients who got drugs covertly more often received antiepileptics, antipsychotics, and anxiolytics compared with patients who were given their drugs openly. CONCLUSIONS: The covert administration of drugs is common in Norwegian nursing homes. Routines for such practice are arbitrary, and the practice is poorly documented in the patients' records.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBMJen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/330/7481/20?view=long&pmid=15561732en
dc.subjectVDP::Medisinske Fag: 700::Klinisk medisinske fag: 750::Geriatri: 778en
dc.subjectVDP::Medisinske Fag: 700::Helsefag: 800::Sykepleievitenskap: 808en
dc.subjectVDP::Medisinske Fag: 700::Helsefag: 800::Helsetjeneste- og helseadministrasjonsforskning: 806en
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshBeveragesen
dc.subject.meshCaregiversen
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen
dc.subject.meshDementiaen
dc.subject.meshDrug Administration Routesen
dc.subject.meshFooden
dc.subject.meshHomes for the Ageden
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshNorwayen
dc.subject.meshNursing Homesen
dc.subject.meshPharmaceutical Preparationsen
dc.subject.meshProfessional Practiceen
dc.titleConcealment of drugs in food and beverages in nursing homes: cross sectional study.en
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.typepeer revieweden
dc.contributor.departmentNorwegian Centre for Dementia Research, Vestfold Mental Health Care Trust, Tønsberg, Postbox 64, N-3107 SEM, Norway. oyvind.kirkevold@nordemens.noen
dc.identifier.journalBMJ (Clinical research ed.)en
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