Abdominal obesity increases the risk of hip fracture. A population-based study of 43 000 women and men aged 60-79 years followed for 8 years. Cohort of Norway.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10143/315537
Title:
Abdominal obesity increases the risk of hip fracture. A population-based study of 43 000 women and men aged 60-79 years followed for 8 years. Cohort of Norway.
Authors:
Søgaard, A J; Holvik, K; Omsland, T K; Tell, G S; Dahl, C; Schei, B; Falch, J A; Eisman, J A; Meyer, H E
Citation:
Abdominal obesity increases the risk of hip fracture. A population-based study of 43 000 women and men aged 60-79 years followed for 8 years. Cohort of Norway. 2014: J. Intern. Med.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSøgaard, A Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHolvik, Ken_GB
dc.contributor.authorOmsland, T Ken_GB
dc.contributor.authorTell, G Sen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDahl, Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSchei, Ben_GB
dc.contributor.authorFalch, J Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEisman, J Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMeyer, H Een_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-09T12:26:46Z-
dc.date.available2014-04-09T12:26:46Z-
dc.date.issued2014-03-05-
dc.identifier.citationAbdominal obesity increases the risk of hip fracture. A population-based study of 43 000 women and men aged 60-79 years followed for 8 years. Cohort of Norway. 2014: J. Intern. Med.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1365-2796-
dc.identifier.pmid24597977-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/joim.12230-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10143/315537-
dc.description.abstractThe question as to whether abdominal obesity has an adverse effect on hip fracture remains unanswered. The purpose of this study was to investigate the associations of waist circumference, hip circumference, waist-hip ratio, and body mass index with incident hip fracture.en_GB
dc.description.abstractThe data in this prospective study is based on Cohort of Norway, a population-based cohort established during 1994-2003. Altogether 19,918 women and 23,061 men aged 60-79 years were followed for a median of 8.1 years. Height, weight, waist and hip circumference were measured at baseline using standard procedures. Information on covariates was collected by questionnaires. Hip fractures (n = 1,498 in women, n = 889 in men) were identified from electronic discharge registers from all general hospitals in Norway between 1994 and 2008.en_GB
dc.description.abstractThe risk of hip fracture decreased with increasing body mass index, plateauing in obese men. However, higher waist circumference and higher waist-hip ratio were associated with an increased risk of hip fracture after adjustment for body mass index and other potential confounders. Women in the highest tertile of waist circumference had an 86% (95% CI: 51-129%) higher risk of hip fracture compared to the lowest, with a corresponding increased risk in men of 100% (95% CI 53-161%). Lower body mass index combined with abdominal obesity increased the risk of hip fracture considerably, particularly in men.en_GB
dc.description.abstractAbdominal obesity was associated with an increased risk of hip fracture when body mass index was taken into account. In view of the increasing prevalence of obesity and the number of older people suffering osteoporotic fractures in Western societies, our findings have important clinical and public health implications.en_GB
dc.languageENG-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of internal medicineen_GB
dc.titleAbdominal obesity increases the risk of hip fracture. A population-based study of 43 000 women and men aged 60-79 years followed for 8 years. Cohort of Norway.en
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.typepeer revieweden
dc.contributor.departmentNorwegian Institute of Public Healthen_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of internal medicineen_GB
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