A systematic review of delay in the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10143/30594
Title:
A systematic review of delay in the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis.
Authors:
Storla, Dag Gundersen; Yimer, Solomon; Bjune, Gunnar Aksel
Citation:
BMC public health 2008, 8:15

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorStorla, Dag Gundersen-
dc.contributor.authorYimer, Solomon-
dc.contributor.authorBjune, Gunnar Aksel-
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-30T07:59:58Z-
dc.date.available2008-06-30T07:59:58Z-
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.identifier.citationBMC public health 2008, 8:15en
dc.identifier.issn1471-2458-
dc.identifier.pmid18194573-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2458-8-15-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10143/30594-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Early diagnosis and immediate initiation of treatment are essential for an effective tuberculosis (TB) control program. Delay in diagnosis is significant to both disease prognosis at the individual level and transmission within the community. Most transmissions occur between the onset of cough and initiation of treatment. METHODS: A systematic review of 58 studies addressing delay in diagnosis and treatment of TB was performed. We found different definitions of, for example, debut of symptoms, first appropriate health care provider, time to diagnosis, and start of treatment. Rather than excluding studies that failed to meet strict scientific criteria (like in a meta-analysis), we tried to extract the "solid findings" from all of them to arrive on a more global understanding of diagnostic delay in TB. RESULTS: The main factors associated with diagnostic delay included human immunodeficiency virus; coexistence of chronic cough and/or other lung diseases; negative sputum smear; extrapulmonary TB; rural residence; low access (geographical or sociopsychological barriers); initial visitation of a government low-level healthcare facility, private practitioner, or traditional healer; old age; poverty; female sex; alcoholism and substance abuse; history of immigration; low educational level; low awareness of TB; incomprehensive beliefs; self-treatment; and stigma. CONCLUSION: The core problem in delay of diagnosis and treatment seemed to be a vicious cycle of repeated visits at the same healthcare level, resulting in nonspecific antibiotic treatment and failure to access specialized TB services. Once generation of a specific diagnosis was in reach, TB treatment was initiated within a reasonable period of time.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectVDP::Medisinske Fag: 700::Klinisk medisinske fag: 750::Lungesykdommer: 777en
dc.subject.meshDiagnostic Errorsen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHIV Infectionsen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshObservationen
dc.subject.meshPatient Acceptance of Health Careen
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factorsen
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen
dc.subject.meshTuberculosis, Pulmonaryen
dc.titleA systematic review of delay in the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis.en
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.typepeer revieweden
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of International Health, Institute of General Practice and Community Medicine, University of Oslo, PO Box 1130 Blindern, N-0318 Oslo, Norway. dgstorla@online.noen
dc.contributor.departmentUllevaal University Hospitalen
dc.identifier.journalBMC public healthen
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