The impact of optimality on maternal sensitivity in mothers with substance abuse and psychiatric problems and their infants at 3 months.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10143/294157
Title:
The impact of optimality on maternal sensitivity in mothers with substance abuse and psychiatric problems and their infants at 3 months.
Authors:
Siqveland, Torill; Smith, Lars; Moe, Vibeke
Citation:
Infant behavior & development. 2012, 35 (1):60-70
Additional Links:
10.1016/j.infbeh.2011.09.004

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSiqveland, Torillen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Larsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMoe, Vibekeen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-19T08:29:38Z-
dc.date.available2013-06-19T08:29:38Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-
dc.identifier.citationInfant behavior & development. 2012, 35 (1):60-70en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1934-8800-
dc.identifier.pmid22071356-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.infbeh.2011.09.004-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10143/294157-
dc.description.abstractThe main aim of this study was to investigate the predictive validity of four different optimality indexes, as well as infant perinatal status, in relation to maternal sensitivity in interaction at 3 months. The four optimality indexes comprised items related to substance abuse, psychiatric condition, relational experience and socioeconomic status (SES). Maternal sensitivity in mother-infant interaction was assessed in two different groups of mothers. One group consisted of mothers with substance abuse and psychiatric problems who underwent treatment during pregnancy. The other group of mothers had neither substance abuse nor psychiatric problems. The expectant mothers were interviewed in the third trimester of pregnancy. Medical records and meconium were obtained from the infants at birth. Three months after birth, maternal sensitivity in mother-infant interaction was assessed. Altogether 79 mother-infant dyads participated in the study. The mothers' optimality associated with relational experiences, as well as the infants' perinatal status were found to predict maternal sensitivity in mother-infant interaction at 3 months. The SES index was also significantly related to maternal sensitivity. The relation between group and maternal sensitivity was mediated by the mothers' optimality associated with relational experiences. This study points to the importance of addressing the mothers' own relational experiences and their current representations of motherhood during treatment, in order to support and enhance maternal sensitivity.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.url10.1016/j.infbeh.2011.09.004en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Infant behavior & developmenten_GB
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshInfanten_GB
dc.subject.meshInfant Behavioren_GB
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshMaternal Behavioren_GB
dc.subject.meshMental Disordersen_GB
dc.subject.meshMother-Child Relationsen_GB
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen_GB
dc.subject.meshPrenatal Exposure Delayed Effectsen_GB
dc.subject.meshSubstance-Related Disordersen_GB
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_GB
dc.titleThe impact of optimality on maternal sensitivity in mothers with substance abuse and psychiatric problems and their infants at 3 months.en
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.typepeer revieweden
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychology, University of Oslo, Norway. torill.siqveland@psykologi.uio.noen_GB
dc.identifier.journalInfant behavior & developmenten_GB
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in HeRA are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.