How children with cancer communicate and think about symptoms.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10143/104901
Title:
How children with cancer communicate and think about symptoms.
Authors:
Vatne, Torun M; Slaugther, Laura; Ruland, Cornelia M
Citation:
Journal of pediatric oncology nursing.27 (1):24-32

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorVatne, Torun Men
dc.contributor.authorSlaugther, Lauraen
dc.contributor.authorRuland, Cornelia Men
dc.date.accessioned2010-06-16T12:48:47Z-
dc.date.available2010-06-16T12:48:47Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of pediatric oncology nursing.27 (1):24-32en
dc.identifier.issn1532-8457-
dc.identifier.pmid19833978-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1043454209349358-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10143/104901-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: For clinicians to effectively help children with their illness and symptoms, it is important to communicate with them in a language they can understand. METHODS: This study investigates how well children with cancer and healthy children understood 44 symptom terms; their thoughts about these symptoms in terms of causes, consequences, and cures; and what other terms the children use to express these symptoms. It also explores if there are differences in understanding and thoughts about symptoms between children who have the experience of cancer and those who do not. In all, 6 children with cancer and 8 healthy children participated in semistructured interviews. RESULTS: Children demonstrated a good understanding of symptom terms, yet were not always able to explain the symptoms. They had a rich vocabulary to talk about symptoms but did not use childish terms. Children with cancer had a more varied vocabulary for symptoms, but they did not use more medical terms. This study contributes to knowledge about children's understanding of symptoms that can be helpful to clinicians when communicating with children about their illness.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was supported with partial funding from the Norwegian Research Council Grant # 175389/V50en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectVDP::Samfunnsvitenskap: 200::Psykologi: 260::Andre psykologiske fag: 279en
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studiesen
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshCommunicationen
dc.subject.meshComprehensionen
dc.subject.meshData Collectionen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practiceen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshInterviews as Topicen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshNeoplasmsen
dc.subject.meshNurse-Patient Relationsen
dc.subject.meshOncologic Nursingen
dc.subject.meshPatient Education as Topicen
dc.subject.meshPediatric Nursingen
dc.subject.meshPerceptionen
dc.subject.meshVocabularyen
dc.titleHow children with cancer communicate and think about symptoms.en
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.typepeer revieweden
dc.contributor.departmentRikshospitalet University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. torun.vatne@rr-research.noen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of pediatric oncology nursing : official journal of the Association of Pediatric Oncology Nursesen
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